Faculty of Liberal Arts

overview

We want to provide more than knowledge, skills, and job-readiness. We help students to become mature, articulate, reflective, enquiring, worshipful, servant-hearted adults by providing solid foundations in certain key educational areas: theological reflection, critical thinking, linguistic competence, and civic awareness. All of these are aligned to the vision of UPH in providing holistic education that truly transforms students.

VISION

UPH Faculty of Liberal Arts conducts its academic vocation in transforming the lives of students holistically based on and in the framework of Reformed Worldview to enable them to appropriate the substance and live as the faithful citizen of the life of the Kingdom.

MISSION

In the wholehearted faith on the Biblical teaching of the creation of human beings in the image and likeness of God endowed with God-given potential in creation, God-preserved potential because of sin, and God-renewed potential because of grace, Faculty of Liberal Arts conducts its academic vocation as a response to the cultural mandate of God, with the definite aim:

  • to enable students to comprehend and appropriate the notion of the unity of truth,
  • to create an educational atmosphere in which students can be nurtured morally and spiritually toward Christ-likeness moral and spiritual formation, and
  • to equip and prepare students with analytical, historical and valuing skills

WHY FLA

  • FLA helps me to see things not only within my perspective but throughout multiple perspectives, to help me understand and tackle the problem clearly & more objectively.

    Yovan Gary Otniel

    Communications 2016

  • FLA has allowed me to think differently about Christianity and it allows me to think deeper about my faith as well.

    Mary

    Communications 2015

  • FLA is very helpful to equip us for our study program, and to equip us with things we need to know for our future profession.

    Tamariska

    Music Therapy 2016

  • I learned a lot of new things, about Jesus, not just on the surface level, but more in-depth of what God is trying to tell us through the Bible.

    Vanny Gosal

    Communications 2015

Frequently Asked Questions

At UPH, we seek to provide a world-class holistic education. This means that you need broad academic foundations, as well as the development of skills and behaviours that can be applied across different areas of life and employment. We don't want to only supply you with academic information; we want to change your life.

Liberal arts education does have a strong history in the West, but Asian cultures - including Indonesia - also have an important history of the general and broad education in both knowledge and character. Our curriculum includes distinctively Indonesian components, such as the study of Pancasila, Asian literature, Indonesian aesthetics, and other topics.

Yes. Employers in the 21st Century are very eager to find candidates who have transferable "soft" skills in areas such as communication, intercultural competence, critical thinking, and reflective skills. We cover all of these in our Liberal Arts curriculum.

No. We have different streams in our Liberal Arts curriculum for those who identify officially as Christian/Catholic, and for those who identify officially with other religions. In all of our courses, students are encouraged to reflect on how their studies relate to themselves personally, but we do not presume that all students are personally Christian, and we do not force you to become Christian. We respect your space to make your own decisions about personal belief.

No; there is a carefully curated set of courses, which we have put together to provide the best possible educational foundations. All students follow the same pathway, depending on their stream (Christian or non-Christian). However, if non-Christian students wish to pursue the Christian stream, they may.

We are increasingly making the Liberal Arts component applied to the individual study programs. For example, we attempt to help nursing students see how their Liberal Arts studies particularly equip them to be the best possible nurses. Some courses are more directly applicable than others, but all will help to provide a holistic education.

CURRICULUM

Each of our foundational areas is taught from a Christ-centered perspective. We attempt to teach these foundations in a way that maintains a constant connection both to the lives of the students and to their educational majors. We hope that by providing rigorous Christ-centered foundations in these areas, we will be contributing to the formation of graduates who are not merely proficient, but truly good.

CORE SUBJECT

Christian Religion: this course studies the Christian canon within the rubric of salvation history focusing on two particular themes: the kingdom and the covenant. The first half of lecture focuses on the Old Testament (OT) and the second half focuses on the New Testament, and particularly the fulfilment of the OT themes and promises in the person of Jesus Christ.

World Religions: this course will deal with the major religions, namely Islam, Judaism, Hinduism, Buddhism, New Age, and Christianity. The main focus will be on the distinct and essential teachings of each religion. Without taking pluralist assumptions, it will also discuss some of how one can relate to people of other faiths like dialogue and possible cooperation for common good as citizens in a multi-religious nation.

Christian Worldview 1: the course consists of three divisions: Theology, Bibliology, and Doctrine of God. The Introductory material is about the worldview in general term, including its definition, necessity, elements, and structure of its justification, and the distinctiveness of Christian worldview in a special term. The main thrust of the elaboration is on the knowledge of God that may lead to a deeper personal relationship with Him for a better understanding and practice of His will.

Philosophy of Science: this course equips the students with an ontological, epistemological and axiological dimension of science in the light of Christian Worldview. It is included in core knowledge that reflects philosophical presupposition of knowledge about God (the Creator), human self (knowing subject) and the world (nature and society as objects of knowledge).

Christian Worldview 2: the course consists of the Christian worldview of human being and its redemptive aspect. A study of the Christian worldview of the human being is the study of Biblical anthropology (the doctrine of man) and hamartiology (the doctrine of sin), while A study of the Christian worldview in terms of its redemptive aspect will focus on the person and work of Jesus Christ.

Ethics: this course is an introduction to Ethics—comprising metaethics, normative ethics, and applied ethics—to help the students to understand and apply their knowledge of moral philosophy in making decisions. The study of ethics will involve critical assessment of various theories of ethics from the perspective and based on the presuppositions of Reformed Theology.

Christian Worldview 3: this course gives a lecture on the Doctrine of the Holy Spirit and the Doctrine of Salvation. The Doctrine of the Holy Spirit will cover topics that include the Spirit’s works in creation, revelation, and the inspiration of the Scriptures. The Doctrine of Salvation will look at the significant role of the Holy Spirit in the application of the finished work of Christ, the benefits of union with Christ, namely, regeneration, reconciliation, justification, sanctification, and the expression of that union in the church.

History of Thought: this course covers three main concepts: the conception of God, mankind, and the world which is essentially derived from God's will and sovereignty alone. Along with the development of human civilization, the thought of the three main things undergoes changes and developments that often vary from one period to another or between one school of thought and other schools of thought. Students will see with another perspective that continually underlines that God is the Creator of history, the Owner of the history, and the One who lives in history through Jesus Christ.

This course teaches the fundamentals of critical thinking & reasoning which is a distinctive sign of his/her dignity as God's image. It provides students with a wide range of cognitive skills and intellectual dispositions needed to effectively identify, analyze, and evaluate arguments and truth claims; to discover and overcome personal prejudices and biases; to formulate and present convincing reasons in support of conclusions; and to make reasonable and logical, smart decisions about what to believe and what to do for the glory of God.

The focus of this course is to instil nationalism and love of the homeland to the learners, as well as to become the initial vehicle of formal political education through understanding and analysis of the values contained in the four pillars of nationality: 1) Pancasila as an ideology; 2) Constitution of the Republic of Indonesia (Unitary State of the Republic of Indonesia) 1945; 3) National values derived from the values of the Unitary State of the Republic of Indonesia; 4) Bhinneka Tunggal Ika.

This course provides knowledge and understanding of the importance of Pancasila as the foundation of the state, state ideology, nation character, national unifying tool, and the form of the civilization of the nation.

This course provides an understanding of making scientific paper. Students will be given lectures on effective sentence, paragraph, and statement so that they have communication skills expressed in the selected study program, profession, and in everyday life. This course is also designed for foreign students who learn in UPH or Indonesian students who cannot speak Bahasa Indonesia fluently, covering basic materials, such as pronouns, imperative words, sentences, etc.

This course prepares students to develop & strengthen mastery of English language skills in academic connections.

Major-elective Subject

Introduction to Natural Sciences: The course will present a foundation for understanding science from a Christian perspective (worldview), and from this vantage point will trace the various philosophical traditions surrounding the growth of science from the Early Modern period to the present. A variety of topics in the biological, chemical, and physical sciences will be used to illustrate the development of science, and in each case, students will focus beyond the science itself to related philosophical and theological considerations.

Introduction to Social Sciences: This course provides an understanding of the basic principles, concepts, and theories of Sociology, Anthropology, Psychology, Political Science, Human Geography, and Economics, as the core of the Social Sciences. A holistic view of the person will be taken through the integrated approach of the Social Sciences through the lens of the Christian Faith. The frame for the course content can be found in the three themes of our material lives; our connected lives; and our ordered lives.

Introduction to Aesthetics & Arts: this course introduces students with the basic concepts found in aesthetics and arts, some types of arts along with ways to appreciate them, and its pivotal role socially, economically, and culturally. Students will have the opportunity to explore their potential through various forms of arts, both as an individual and as a team.

This course introduces students to the elements of literature, to several themes and approaches that are popular with literature. These topics will be discussed and seen through the Christian worldview. Students are invited to think of how literary works convey meaning and see their close relationship with their existence as students and social members of society.

Frequently Asked Questions

At UPH, we seek to provide a world-class holistic education. This means that you need broad academic foundations, as well as the development of skills and behaviours that can be applied across different areas of life and employment. We don't want to only supply you with academic information; we want to change your life.

Liberal arts education does have a strong history in the West, but Asian cultures - including Indonesia - also have an important history of a general, broad education in both knowledge and character. Our curriculum includes distinctively Indonesian components, such as the study of Pancasila, Asian literature, Indonesian aesthetics, and other topics.

Yes. Employers in the 21st Century are very eager to find candidates who have transferable "soft" skills in areas such as communication, intercultural competence, critical thinking, and reflective skills. We cover all of these in our Liberal Arts curriculum.

No. We have different streams in our Liberal Arts curriculum for those who identify officially as Christian/Catholic, and for those who identify officially with other religions. In all of our courses, students are encouraged to reflect on how their studies relate to themselves personally, but we do not presume that all students are personally Christian, and we do not force you to become Christian. We respect your space to make your own decisions about personal belief.

No; there is a carefully curated set of courses, which we have put together to provide the best possible educational foundations. All students follow the same pathway, depending on their stream (Christian or non-Christian). However, if non-Christian students wish to pursue the Christian stream, they may.

We are increasingly making the Liberal Arts component applied to the individual study programs. For example, we attempt to help nursing students see how their Liberal Arts studies particularly equip them to be the best possible nurses. Some courses are more directly applicable than others, but all will help to provide a holistic education.

FACULTY MEMBER

Adriani Gunawan, M.M.

Director of Administration Conservatory of Music & Faculty of Liberal Arts

Earning multiple bachelor's degrees in Management and Education in Australia, Adriani furthered her master's studies in Early Childhood and in School Management in Indonesia. As co-founder of a kindergarten, she has over 10 years of marketing and management experience in multi-national companies and over 20 years of experience in the education field.

Drs. Gandadinata Thamrin, M.A., M.M., D.Min.

Deputy Department of Language and Life Skills

He graduated in 1991 from Atma Jaya Yogayakarta University then continued his Magister Management in GS Fame Institute in 1998, Magister of Arts of Sekolah Tinggi Amanat Agung Jakarta in 2003, Magister of Arts in Counseling (STT Jaffray) in 2017 and Doctor Ministry of STT Cipanas in 2018. Besides, he was also member of Yayasan STT Amanat Agung for the period of 2011 to 2015, had 20 years working experience as Plant Manager and Production Manager in manufacturing industry, and had experiences in Skit Management and Arts. He also has interest in family counselling, Logotherapy and reptile.

Alexander Aur, M.A.

Dra. Christina Purwanti, M.Pd.

Drs. Daniel Suryono Said, M.Pd.

Desman Berkati Larosa, M.Th.

Fery Alexander Pasang, S.Th., M.A.

Dr. Hananto, S.Pd., M.A.

Irene Rebecca Angela Tobing, S.Pd., M.Sc., Ph.D

Jonter Pandapotan Sitorus, M. Pd.

Junry Jan Alow, S.Th., M.Div., M.Th., D.Min(C)

Kusman Sudarja, M.Pd.

Martianus Zega, S.Th., M.Min.

Pieter Maspaitella, S.Th., M.Div.

Rudy Hartono, M.Th.

Tikno Iensufiie, S.T., M.Pd., M.A.

Matthew R. Malcolm, Ph.D.

Executive Dean of Faculty of Liberal Arts

Matthew Malcolm graduated with honours from the Australian College of Theology before gaining a Ph.D in New Testament from the University of Nottingham, UK. After working in theological education in Australia he joined the Faculty of Liberal Arts at UPH in 2016, becoming the Dean in 2017. At this time he was also completing an M.Ed at the University of Western Australia. Dr. Malcolm has published several books in the field of biblical interpretation, and continues to conduct research in the areas of biblical interpretation and liberal arts education. He sees the Faculty of Liberal Arts as providing a crucial educational foundation for UPH students, and he strives to enable students to fulfill their God-given potential in their lives and studies.

Richard Anselmus Poeh, S.S., M.Hum.

Deputy Department of Theology and Philosophy

Richard holds a master degree in English Language Studies from Universitas Sanata Dharma (Yogyakarta). His area of specialization is literature, with special interest on the relation between Christian worldview and teaching literature. He also has a passion in apologetics, as it is perceived as the logical consequence of being Christian and scholar.

Aloysius Prasetya Adiseputra, M.A.

Dra. Clara Evi C. Citraningtyas, M.A., Ph.D.

David Tobing, S.TP., M.Hum.

Dra. Devy Stany Walukow, M.Hum., M.Si.

Dr. Phil Fitzerald Kennedy Sitorus, S.Sos., S.Fil.

Hanna Suteja, S.Pd., M.Hum.

Jessica Novia Layantara, M.Th.

Joshua Hutauruk, B.A., M.B.A.

Karnelasatri, M.Si.

Dr. Drs. Laba Sinuor Yosephus, S.S., M.Hum.

Noveliza Rudyolindy Theodora Tepy, S.Pd., M.Pd.

Rieswan Pangawira Kurnia, S.T., M.Sc., M.Pd.

Ir. Setiawan Sutanto, M.Div.

Heri Yulianto, S.Th.

Head of Faculty of Liberal Arts

After finishing his Theology study in South East Asia Seminary (Seminari Alkitab Asia Tenggara) in 2009, currently Mr. Yulianto is in the final process of getting his Magister of Ministry from Amanat Agung Seminar (Sekolah Tinggi Teologia Amanat Agung). In UPH, he has been involved in academic activities as lecturers and ministry to students.

Agnes Sutekno, S.T., M.A.

Binsar Sihite, M.A.

Daniel Lee Kim, M.Div., Th.M., Ph.D.

Deni Citra Damai Telaumbanua, M.Th.

Ferdinandus Butarbutar, M.Th.

Dr. Fransisco Budi Hardiman

Hendra Thamrindinata, S.Si., M.Div., M.A.(Th.)

Dr. Jonathan David King

Junius Hardy, S.T., M.T., M.A.

Kristina Untari Setiawan, M.M.

Maria Bernadetta Rini Wahyuningsih, S.P., M.Si., M.Ed., Ph.D.

Paulus Heru Wibowo Kurniawan, S.S., M.Sn.

Drs. Roedy Silitonga, M.A.E., M.Th.

Dr. Drs. Thomas T. Pureklolon, M.Ph., M.M., M.Si.

Frequently Asked Questions

At UPH, we seek to provide a world-class holistic education. This means that you need broad academic foundations, as well as the development of skills and behaviours that can be applied across different areas of life and employment. We don't want to only supply you with academic information; we want to change your life.

Liberal arts education does have a strong history in the West, but Asian cultures - including Indonesia - also have an important history of the general and broad education in both knowledge and character. Our curriculum includes distinctively Indonesian components, such as the study of Pancasila, Asian literature, Indonesian aesthetics, and other topics.

Yes. Employers in the 21st Century are very eager to find candidates who have transferable "soft" skills in areas such as communication, intercultural competence, critical thinking, and reflective skills. We cover all of these in our Liberal Arts curriculum.

No. We have different streams in our Liberal Arts curriculum for those who identify officially as Christian/Catholic, and for those who identify officially with other religions. In all of our courses, students are encouraged to reflect on how their studies relate to themselves personally, but we do not presume that all students are personally Christian, and we do not force you to become Christian. We respect your space to make your own decisions about personal belief.

No; there is a carefully curated set of courses, which we have put together to provide the best possible educational foundations. All students follow the same pathway, depending on their stream (Christian or non-Christian). However, if non-Christian students wish to pursue the Christian stream, they may.

We are increasingly making the Liberal Arts component applied to the individual study programs. For example, we attempt to help nursing students see how their Liberal Arts studies particularly equip them to be the best possible nurses. Some courses are more directly applicable than others, but all will help to provide a holistic education.